Simon Institute to host virtual event with U.S. Sen. Duckworth

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U.S. Sen. Tammy Duckworth of Illinois will join Southern Illinois University Carbondale’s Paul Simon Public Policy Institute for a virtual conversation at noon on Oct. 4.



In this Feb. 14, 2018, photo, Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., speaks to Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Summit, on Capitol Hill, in Washington. 




AP



Institute director John Shaw will interview Duckworth about the legislative agenda on Capitol Hill, challenges facing American foreign policy and Duckworth’s new memoir, “Every Day Is a Gift.”

Duckworth, a Democrat, was elected to the U.S. Senate in 2016 after serving in the U.S. House of Representatives for two terms. She is a veteran of the Iraq War and received the Purple Heart after the Blackhawk helicopter she was piloting was hit by a grenade in November of 2004, causing Duckworth to lose her legs. She was the director of the Illinois Department of Veterans Affairs from 2006 to 2009 and served as assistant director of the nation’s Department of Veterans Affairs from 2009 to 2011.

Duckworth serves on several Senate committees, including Armed Services; Environment and Public Works; Commerce, Science, and Transportation; and Small Business and Entrepreneurship. In 2018, she became the first person to give birth while serving in the Senate.

“Sen. Duckworth has had a remarkable military and political career,” Shaw said. “She served with distinction and courage in the U.S. Army and has held important positions in Illinois state government and the federal government. A highly respected United States senator, we are eager to hear Sen. Duckworth’s views on the packed and consequential legislative agenda on Capitol Hill this fall and the raft of pressing questions about the future of American foreign policy.”

Attendees are encouraged to submit questions for Duckworth with their registration or send them by email to paulsimoninstitute@siu.edu.

The event is part of the Paul Simon Public Policy Institute’s “Understanding Our New World” virtual conversation series with government and private sector leaders, policy experts, political analysts, authors and journalists.

Gov. J.B. Pritzker joins U.S. Senators Tammy Duckworth and Dick Durbin "to celebrate the heroism of the C-130 Aircraft Fleet and the Illinois National Guard" on Tuesday at the Illinois State Fair.



Photos: A look at presidential pets through the years

Presidential Pet Fala and Major 1933

Chauffeur Monte Snyder is the fast friend of Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelts dogs Meggie the terrier, left, and Major, the police dog, on the White House grounds, March 24, 1933, Washington, D.C. (AP Photo)




ASSOCIATED PRESS



Franklin D. Roosevelt with Fala

President Franklin D. Roosevelt relaxes with Eleanor Roosevelt at their Hyde Park, New York home on July 25, 1941. Mrs. Roosevelt is knitting as the president gives his attention to his dog Fala. (AP Photo)




ASSOCIATED PRESS



FDR And Fala

President Franklin D. Roosevelt lifts his dog Fala as he prepares to motor from his special train to the Yacht Potomac at New London, Conn., Aug. 3, 1941. The president began a vacation voyage scheduled for a week or 10 days. (AP Photo/George Skadding)




George Skadding



Presidential Pet Fala 1943

Three army aviation cadets in training Herbert Sohopka, left, as Walter Hawkins, center, and J.C. Davidson, meet Fala, right, Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelts dog who accompanied his Chief on Tour of Inspection of Southeast War Establishments, April 20, 1943, Maxwell Field, Ala. (AP Photo)




Anonymous



U.S. President Harry Truman Pets Dog Feller

Oblivious to its palatial and imposing surroundings, feller, a five-weeks-old cocker spaniel gift to President Truman, sits disconsolately outside its shipping case in a large corridor of the White House in Washington on Dec. 22, 1947. The ball at its feet gets no play as the pup waits for a playful fiend. (AP Photo/Bill Smith)




Bill Smith



White House Pets

FILE – In this March 20, 1962 file photo, President John F. Kennedy’s daughter Caroline Kennedy rides her pony, Macaroni, on the south grounds of the White House in Washington. An unidentified handler runs along to keep pace. The arrival of the Biden pets will also mark the next chapter in a long history of pets residing at the White House after a four-year hiatus during the Trump administration. “Pets have always played an important role in the White House throughout the decades,” said Jennifer Pickens, an author who studies White House traditions. (AP Photo/File)




STF



Kennedy Dog Thanksgiving Ceremony

Charlie, Caroline Kennedy’s pet Welsh terrier, inspects a turkey presented to President Kennedy after a traditional Thanksgiving week ceremony at the White House in Washington, Nov. 19, 1963. President Kennedy "pardoned" the bird, sending it back to the farm. Charlie had the run of the grounds during the ceremony. (AP Photo)




Anonymous



Presidential Pets 1965

President Lyndon Johnson lets his beagle Him peer from open window as the president toured the Johnson City area, Nov. 2, 1965. The first family went to Johnson City. Tex., to vote in a state election and then took newsmen on a tour. (AP Photo)




Anonymous



Presidential Pets 1966

As President Lyndon Johnson and his family leave their plane, shown at top of ramp, a Secret Service agent disentangle the three White House beagles, Kimberly, Freckles and Him, that accompanied the president on his trip to the LBJ Ranch for the Easter holidays, April 1966. The party landed at Randolph Air Force Base and boarded a smaller jet for the short flight to the ranch. (AP Photo/Ted Powers)




Ted Powers



Presidential Pets 1964

President Lyndon Johnson and his family took advantage of the warm weather to play with their pet Beagles, Him and Her, in the flower garden, April 19, 1964 at the White House in Washington. Luci is playing with him at left, with her sister, Lynda beside her. (AP Photo/Bill Allen)




Bill Allen



Presidential Pets 1965

This study of President Lyndon Johnson was made as the Chief Executive stood at his White House desk, Oct. 6, 1965 in Washington with his white collie, Blanco. Johnson is scheduled to undergo a gall bladder operation on Friday at the Bethesda Naval Hospital. (AP Photo)




Anonymous



Luci Greets Blanco

Luci Johnson and her fiance, Pat Nugent, greet the Johnson family collie, Blanco, July 11, 1966. Luci and Pat flew back from a stay at the LBJ Ranch in Texas with President and Mrs. Johnson. Traphes Bryant of the White House staff holds the leashes of Blanco and the two Johnson beagles. (AP Photo/John Rous)




John Rous



Presidential Pets 1966

President Lyndon Johnson poses with Freckles, mother of five Beagle pups at the White House in Washington, Nov. 4, 1966. The president, just before leaving the Executive Mansion for his Texas ranch, showed off the pups, Freckles and Edgar, a gift from FBI director J. Edgar Hoover. The father of the pups is reported to be Jones Brookline Buddy, owned by Jean Austin DuPont of Wilmington, Delaware. (AP Photo/John Rous)




John Rous



Presidential Pets 1967

‘Yuki’, President Lyndon Johnson?s pet mongrel, is held out the window of the car driven by LBJ as the first family starts a ride around the Texas ranch in Stonewall, Texas, Sept. 30, 1967. Johnson, driver for the outing, is holding Yuki. In the car are Lady Bird Johnson, Pat and Luci Nugent, Lynda Bird and Marine Capt. Charles Robb. (AP Photo)




Anonymous



Presidential Pets 1967

Lyndon Johnson, President of the United States, looks to his left while addressing gathered dignitaries at the signing of the Food Stamp Bill, Oct. 5, 1967 at the White House in Washington while, below, his newest pet, Yuki, does the same. Found as a pup by the President?s youngest daughter, the animal, whose name in Japanese means snow, has since then become the president?s favorite. (AP Photo/Bob Daugherty)




Bob Daugherty



Presidential Pets 1967

Presidential pup Yuki sports a Santa Claus costume – a red and white hat and beard – as the dog waited for its master, President Lyndon Johnson, to light the National Christmas Tree, Dec. 15, 1967 near the White House in Washington. Pin on the hat reads ?LBJ.? (AP Photo)




Anonymous



Presidential Pets 1967

President Lyndon Johnson and Lady Bird Johnson, and Yuki, the White House pet, pose beside the family Christmas tree in Washington, Dec. 24, 1967, a Norway spruce. Yuki takes a stand atop some of the family Christmas gifts arranged under the tree. The President returned from his round-the-world journey. The setting is in the Yellow Oval Room in the second floor of the White House. (AP Photo)




Anonymous



Presidential Pets 1968

Yuki, a white mongrel belonging to President Lyndon Johnson, appears over-anxious to accompany his master as the president and Col. Frank C. Malone stride from the presidential jet at Bergstrom Air Force Base in Austin, Texas, Jan. 11, 1968. Malone is commanding officer of Bergstrom Air Force Base. (AP Photo)




Anonymous



Presidential Pets 1968

Disregarding protocol pertaining to President Lyndon Johnson, his dog Yuki was way in front at Dulles International Airport in Washington, as the president prepared for a flight to Texas, March 1, 1968. Here Yuki waits for her master to climb the steps. (AP Photo/Charles Tasnadi)




Charles Tasnadi



Presidential Pets 1968

Disregarding protocol pertaining to President Lyndon Johnson, his dog Yuki was way in front at Dulles International Airport in Washington, as the president prepared for a flight to Texas, March 1, 1968. Here Yuki leads the way as the President hurries toward his jet. (AP Photo/Charles Tasnadi)




Charles Tasnadi



Presidential Pets 1968

President Lyndon Johnson took time from his busy schedule, to feed his nine-month-old grandson, Lyn Nugent, in the White House Rose Garden, March 29, 1968 in Washington. The food was cream topped gelatin and cookies. Waiting and hoping for a share is Yuki, the President?s constant companion. (AP Photo/Bob Daugherty)




Bob Daugherty



Presidential Pets 1968

Patrick Lyndon Nugent, President Lyndon Johnson?s grandson, reaches for the president?s dog, Yuki, as the first family sits for a holiday portrait outside the LBJ Ranch house in Stonewall, Texas, Nov. 28, 1968. The 17-month-old baby?s mother, Luci, is at left. Others, left to right, are the president, Lady Bird Johnson and their eldest daughter, Lvnda. (AP Photo)




Anonymous



Presidential Pets 1969

President Richard Nixon and his dog King Timahoe, arrive at the Western White House office in San Clemente after driving through a heavy fog in Nixon?s golf cart, Aug. 20, 1969. Nixon drives his golf cart from summer vacation home to office daily. (AP Photo)




Anonymous



Presidential Pets 1970

President Richard Nixon pauses briefly to shake hands with his dog King Timahoe prior to addressing the press, Nov. 4, 1970 at the western White House in San Clemente, to air his views on the election outcome. (AP Photo)




Anonymous



Presidential Pets 1974

President Richard Nixon?s dog King Timahoe takes a sample of the birthday cake presented to the president by the White House staff in a small party, Jan. 9, 1974 at the Western White House in San Clemente. First lady Pat Nixon and daughter Tricia shared in the festivities. (AP Photo)




Anonymous



Presidential Pets 1974

Liberty a golden retriever, is the newest addition to the White House family, seen Oct. 6, 1974. The eight-month-old female dog was given to the president by daughter Susan and White House photographer David Kennerly. (AP Photo/John Duricka)




John Duricka



Presidential Pets 1974

Liberty, President Gerald Ford’s golden retriever, receives greetings from the president as he made an unexpected visit to the Oval Office, Nov. 16, 1974 in Washington. Liberty dropped by while Ford was meeting with Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and Maj. Gen. Brent Scowcroft, deputy assistant for national security affairs. (AP Photo/Charles Tasnadi)




Charles Tasnadi



Gerald Ford; Susan Ford; Gerald R. Ford

**FILE** This Oct. 7, 1974 file photo shows President Gerald Ford and his daughter, Susan, on the South Lawn of the White House with their dog, Liberty. (AP Photo/FILE)




ASSOCIATED PRESS



Presidential Pets 1976

Jerry, a pup from the litter of President Gerald Ford and first lady Betty Ford’s golden retriever Liberty, greets Mrs. Ford with a wet kiss on the face at a rally in a high school in Auburn Heights, Michigan, Oct. 28, 1976. Jerry was presented as a gift to the Leader Dogs for the Blind School in nearby Rochester, Mich., and presently is being trained there. (AP Photo)




JCH



Presidential Pets 1970s

Jake, an Irish setter, causes a little distraction as President Gerald Ford hits a few practice shots, Oct. 20, at Congressional Country Club in nearby Potomac, Maryland. Each time Ford hit a ball Jake would lay down in front of him and then bound after the ball. (AP Photo)




Anonymous



Presidential Pets 1981

President Ronald Reagan muses with reporters and photographers after being taken by surprise by his faithful canine companion, Millie, Aug. 14, 1981 in Santa Barbara. Millie joined her master shortly after the president completed signing landmark legislation cutting the federal budget and taxes at his California ranch near Santa Barbara. (AP Photo/Wally Fong)




Wally Fong



Presidential Pets 1985

President Ronald Reagan, along with his son Michael?s family and the president?s dog Lucky, gather around a snowman on the White House grounds, Jan. 19, 1985. From left are, Michael?s son Cameron, the president, Michael, and his wife Colleen holding her daughter Ashley. (AP Photo/Ira Schwarz)




Ira Schwarz



Ronald Reagan, Nancy Reagan, Lucky

** FILE ** In this Jan. 6, 1985 black-and-white file photo, President Reagan and first lady Nancy Reagan walk toward the White House in Washington, with their dog "Lucky," shortly after returning from a weekend at the presidential retreat at Camp David, Md. (AP Photo/Ron Edmonds, File)




Ron Edmonds



REAGANS

**FILE** This December 1986 file photo shows first lady Nancy Reagan holding the Reagans’ pet Rex, a King Charles spaniel, as she and President Reagan walk on the White House South lawn. (AP Photo/Dennis Cook, FILE)




DENNIS COOK



BUSH MILLIE

**FILE** This Aug. 24, 1992 file photo shows President Bush, right, and first lady Barbara Bush walking with their dog Millie across the South Lawn as they return to the White House in. (AP Photo/Scott Applewhite, File)




SCOTT APPLEWHITE



Socks

** FILE ** In this Dec. 25, 1994 file photo, Socks, the Clinton family cat, perches atop a reindeer statue on the White House lawn behind the Oval Office in Washington. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File)




Wilfredo Lee



CLINTON BUDDY

**FILE** This March 13, 1998 file photo shows President Clinton, center, and first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton with first puppy Buddy as they leave the White House for a presidential retreat at Camp David, Md. (AP Photo/J.Scott Applewhite, FILE)




J.SCOTT APPLEWHITE



Bill Clinton, Buddy

** FILE ** In this March 22, 1999 file photo, President Clinton returns to White House in Washington with his dog Buddy. (AP Photo/Ron Edmonds, File)




Ron Edmonds



White House Pets

FILE- This Nov. 11, 2000 file photo shows then-Republican presidential candidate Texas Gov. George W. Bush and running mate Dick Cheney walk down a dirt road to meet with reporters, followed by Bush’s dog Spot, near Crawford, Texas. The arrival of the Biden pets will also mark the next chapter in a long history of pets residing at the White House after a four-year hiatus during the Trump administration. “Pets have always played an important role in the White House throughout the decades,” said Jennifer Pickens, an author who studies White House traditions. (AP Photo/Eric Draper, File)




Eric Draper



BUSH

**FILE** This Aug. 4, 2001 file photo shows President Bush as he takes his dogs, Spot, left, and Barney to the helicopter after arriving at Fort Hood, Texas, on their way to the family ranch in Crawford, Texas for a vacation. (AP Photo/Bill Janscha, FILE)




BILL JANSCHA



Dale Haney

White House horticulturist Dale Haney, right, holds presidential pet Barney, as visitors wait for President Bush and first lady Laura Bush’s arrival on the South Lawn at the White House, Sunday, Aug. 20, 2006, in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)




MANUEL BALCE CENETA



India, Miss Beazley

October may be a black cat’s favorite month, but presidential pets India, left, and Miss Beazley, right, don’t appear to be each other’s favorites as they square-off during a walk on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Monday, Oct. 2, 2006. The dust-up was over quickly, and the cloistered companions returned peacefully to the White House. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)




J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE



George W. Bush, Barney

** FILE ** In this Feb. 29, 2008 file photo, President Bush and his dog Barney steps from Air Force One after arriving in Waco, Texas. (AP Photo/Duane A. Laverty, File)




Duane A. Laverty



Barack Obama, Michelle Obama, Sasha Obama, Malia Obama, Bo

Malia Obama walks with new dog Bo, followed by President Barack Obama, Sasha Obama and first lady Michelle Obama on the South Lawn at the White House in Washington, Tuesday, April 14, 2009. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)




Charles Dharapak



White House Pets

FILE – This Aug. 4, 2010 file photo shows presidential pet Bo climbing the stairs of Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base, Md. for a flight to Chicago with President Barack Obama. Pets are back at the White House. President Joe Biden’s German shepherds Champ and Major moved in over the weekend. They are the first dogs to live at the executive mansion since the Obama administration. Biden and his wife, Jill, adopted Major in 2018 from the Delaware Humane Association. They got Champ after the 2008 election. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)




Cliff Owen



Bo, Sunny

FILE – In this May 17, 2014, file photo, the Presidential dogs Bo, left, and Sunny, are walked by a handler on the South Lawn of the White House. The Portuguese water dogs are the Obama family pets. Sunny, the Portuguese water dog who joined fellow first dog Bo and the Obama family in 2013, has housetraining issues, the first lady said. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)




Jacquelyn Martin



Westminster Dog Show Trump

FILE – In this Nov. 28, 2014 file photo, first lady Michelle Obama, left, follows her daughters Malia Obama, center, and Sasha Obama, as they walk with their dogs, Bo and Sunny as they arrive to welcome the Official White House Christmas Tree to the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)




Susan Walsh



Biden

President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden’s dogs Champ, left, and Major are seen on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, March 31, 2021. (Mandel Ngan/Pool via AP)

The Bidens announced Saturday, June 19, that their "beloved" German Shepherd Champ died.




Mandel Ngan



Biden

President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden’s dogs Champ, right, and Major are seen on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, March 31, 2021. (Mandel Ngan/Pool via AP)

The Bidens announced Saturday, June 19, that their "beloved" German Shepherd Champ died.




Mandel Ngan



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Region: Southern,Local,City: Carbondale,Region: Carbondale

via The Southern

September 24, 2021 at 05:37PM

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