COLUMN: Why is Labor Day important?

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The origin of Labor Day was to conduct a national tribute to the workers who were building the nation. Society valued the contribution of workers and wanted to show an appreciation for the workers. The workers who were building the infrastructure of the nation, roads, bridges, rails, buildings and housing. A day was set aside to do so, and it is just as important today as it was in the late 1800s.

Multiple times a year there is a ribbon cutting ceremony with dignitaries and politicians when a new building or project has finished. At the event there are lots of smiling faces, handshakes, and acknowledgments exchanged, it is a joyous event for those who are involved. 

Labor Day is our ribbon cutting ceremony. The spotlight turns to the men and women who has made sure when the light switch gets turned on the light comes on, when you turn on the faucet, clean water comes out. The spotlight is on the worker who poured the concrete or installed the windows, those who operated the machinery to set the equipment in place or properly grade the road. It is the day we get recognized as the dignitary. 

Workers who build our communities take great pride in doing so. Over the last several months our men and women have continued to build our community during the COVID pandemic. The workforce couldn’t meet via Zoom to lay a block foundation or work from home to make sure one of the biggest construction projects in the state at a local factory was getting the steel set, concrete poured, electrical upgraded, and piping piped to meet the demands of the customer.  An e-mail chain won’t get the asphalt paved or the walls hung with drywall, finished, and painted. It’s impossible to socially distance when performing many of these duties. The men and women of the Union Building Trades have been coming to work to fulfill the needs of the community. Every day they have been putting themselves at risk. Commerce has been able to continue and the economy to churn even in these times because of these unsung heroes.

The unsung heroes are your neighbors. We are your fellow parishioners at church, the fans in the stands at the youth game, the people donating clothing and food at the shelter, we are your friends, and we are just as important to the community as the CEO, elected official, or any other dignitary. We take great pride in what we do and the union organizations that we belong to. 

Labor Day is the day to be recognized for our achievements so just as it was important in the late 1800’s there is still a lot to celebrate, reflect, and recharge on this day. Please enjoy Labor Day and keep in mind the workers who build our infrastructure. 

17 historical clippings of BloNo celebrating Labor Day

Parading the trombones

Updated

Ran in The Pantagraph on Tuesday, September 05, 1978.

See the clipping.



The Pantagraph Archives


Parade highpoint

Updated

Ran in The Pantagraph on Tuesday, September 02, 1997.

See the clipping.



The Pantagraph Archives


Coal miners

Updated

Ran in The Pantagraph on Monday, September 03, 1951.

See the clipping.



The Pantagraph Archives


Teamsters

Updated

Ran in The Pantagraph on Monday, September 03, 1951.

See the clipping.



The Pantagraph Archives


Meat-laden float

Updated

Ran in The Pantagraph on Monday, September 03, 1951.

See the clipping.



The Pantagraph Archives


Hard work

Updated

Ran in The Pantagraph on Tuesday, September 07, 1976.

See the clipping.



The Pantagraph Archives


At the end of the summer

Updated

Ran in The Pantagraph on Sunday, August 27, 1978.

See the clipping.



The Pantagraph Archives


Labor Day

Updated

Ran in The Pantagraph on Monday, September 01, 1941.

See the clipping.



The Pantagraph Archives


Popular pastime

Updated

Ran in The Pantagraph on Monday, September 01, 1941.

See the clipping.



The Pantagraph Archives


This is life!

Updated

Ran in The Pantagraph on Monday, September 01, 1941.

See the clipping.



The Pantagraph Archives


The United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America

Updated

Ran in The Pantagraph on Tuesday, September 05, 1989.

See the clipping.



The Pantagraph Archives


Watching the parade

Updated

Ran in The Pantagraph on Tuesday, September 05, 1989.

See the clipping.



The Pantagraph Archives


Thousands line the route

Updated

Ran in The Pantagraph on Thursday, September 03, 1998.

See the clipping.



The Pantagraph Archives


The Normal Community Marching Band

Updated

Ran in The Pantagraph on Tuesday, September 06, 1994.

See the clipping.



The Pantagraph Archives


Working

Updated

Ran in The Pantagraph on Monday, September 04, 1978.

See the clipping.



The Pantagraph Archives


Dr. Leslie Quiram

Updated

Published in The Pantagraph on Monday, September 01, 1997.

See the clipping.



The Pantagraph Archives


Labor Day observance at country clubs extends over weekend

Updated

Published in The Pantagraph on Sunday, September 03, 1933.

See the clipping.



The Pantagraph Archives


Mike Raikes is president of McLean-Livingston County Building Trades.

State

via Newsbug.info

September 4, 2021 at 10:38PM

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